Tutorials

HT'2001 tutorials are intended to appeal to the interests of conference attendees across a broad range of topics - providing opportunities to develop knowledge and practical in emerging areas. The tutorials are presented by experts in the their respective fields.

T1: WebDAV and DeltaV: The Writeable, Collaborative, Versionable Web

Presenter
Jim Whitehead
Duration
Full day
Date
To be announced
Presenter Bio

Jim Whitehead is the Chair and Founder of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) working group on Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV), and is a co-author on all major specifications produced by this working group. Jim additionally spearheaded the formation of the DeltaV working group for Web versioning and configuration management, and is an author on the DeltaV protocol specification. Jim has led several student teams developing prototype WebDAV implementations, including the WebDAV Explorer client.

Jim is also an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research interests include hypertext versioning, collaborative authoring, web protocols, open hypermedia (the Chimera system), configuration management, and software architecture. Jim has a Ph.D and MS in Information and Computer Science from U.C. Irvine (Ph.D. dissertation: "An Analysis of the Hypertext Versioning Domain"), and a BS in Electrical Engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Description

At present, the Web is primarily a read-only medium, providing excellent support for browsing content, and limited support for authoring new content. WebDAV is a standard developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for extending the Web with collaborative authoring capability, and is supported by such industry-leading tools as Office 2000, Photoshop 6, GoLive 5, Internet Explorer 5, Mac OS X, Apache, Internet Information Services 5, Oracle iFS, and Jigsaw, along with Web storage sites such as Driveway, My Docs Online, and Sharemation. Building on this strong base of support, the DeltaV protocol adds versioning and configuration management capabilities to WebDAV servers. With DeltaV, it is possible to record the revision history of Web resources, work on collections of resources in isolation from other collaborators (workspaces), and create consistent configurations of these resources.

This tutorial gives an overview of the WebDAV Distributed Authoring protocol (RFC 2518), and the Web Versioning and Configuration Management protocol (DeltaV). This is a novice-to-intermediate level tutorial, which assumes some knowledge about the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP), although a brief overview of this protocol will be given during the course.

The WebDAV Distributed Authoring protocol provides operations for:

  • Overwrite Prevention: Locking facilities allow a document author to prevent modifications by other authors during an edit session, thus preventing the "lost update" problem.
  • Properties: WebDAV properties are name, value pairs which can be used to record metadata about a web resource, such as it's author, creation date, length, etc. WebDAV properties are well-formed Extensible Markup Language (XML), and hence can support Resource Description Framework (RDF) values.
  • Collections: The ability to create sets of related documents and to retrieve a hierarchical membership listing (like a directory listing in a file system).
  • Namespace Operations: The ability to copy and move single web resources, and to copy, move and lock entire hierarchies of web resources.

The Web Versioning and Configuration Management protocol (DeltaV) adds capabilities for:

  • Versioning: Recording the revision history of a document over time. Versioning can be explicit, using checkin/checkout, or automatic, with WebDAV locks controlling creation of revisions.
  • Workspaces: Working on a group of documents in isolation from all other active collaborators.
  • Baselines: Recording a consistent configuration of resources at a particular instant in time. This is useful for recording the released state of a collection of source code, or documents.
  • Activities: Calling a group of revisions a logical change. For example, fixing an error in source code might involve making several revisions.

By using these operations, both existing HTML authoring applications, as well as more traditional word processing, spreadsheet, and image manipulation applications can support remote collaborative authoring and versioning. Since a WebDAV-enabled application can save directly to the web, and makes use of the overwrite prevention capabilities, these applications provide a way to seamlessly move from individual to collaborative work. So, using a WebDAV-enabled word processor, you can begin work on a document, then later realize you need to add several co-authors. After saving your document to the web, and emailing the URL to your collaborators, you can all begin to collaboratively work on the document in-place on the web.

Building upon its current strong base of supporting tools, in the next 1-2 years WebDAV is expected to be broadly adopted by content authoring tools. This will bring the benefits of the writeable Web to millions of users, opening significant opportunities for Internet Service Providers, Web storage sites, document management, content authoring tools, protocol developers, and researchers. Furthermore, Web write-enabling existing applications is just the first phase of WebDAV adoption. DeltaV will allow the Web to be used as the core infrastructure for remote software development, especially Open Source, replacing the remote CVS protocol. With its automatic versioning capabilities, DeltaV also allows existing WebDAV authoring tools to take advantage of versioning-capable servers.

WebDAV/DeltaV is one of the most substantial, yet under-hyped changes to the core architecture of the Web. By attending this tutorial, you will develop a deep understanding of the capabilities and potential of this increasingly important standard.

T2: SMIL 2.0: The Next Wave of Hypermedia on the Web

Presenter
Lloyd Rutledge
Duration
Full day
Date
To be announced
Presenter Bio

Lloyd Rutledge is a researcher at CWI. His research involves adaptable hypermedia, and standards for it such as SMIL. He received his Sc.D. from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, where he worked with the Distributed Multimedia Systems Laboratory (DMSL) on developing the HyOctane HyTime-based hypermedia environment. Dr. Rutledge is a member of the W3C working group that developed SMIL. He has given this SMIL tutorial at many venues including WWW10, WWW9 and WWW8, ACM Multimedia 99, Multimedia Modeling 2000 and Hypertext 2000, 99 and 98. He is also co-author of "SMIL: Multimedia on the Web", to be published this year by Pearson Education.

Description

SMIL 1.0 is a W3C recommendation, approved in June 1998 and now a strong presence on the Web, which provides a vendor-independent, declarative language for hypermedia presentations on the Web. With at least three players currently available, and with more and more presentations being posted on the Web, SMIL promises to do for interactive multimedia what HTML did for hypertext: bring it into every living room with an easy-to-author, readily implementable format and easily accessible players for it.

SMIL 2.0 is nearing completion and is expected to be released by the W3C in the coming months -- just in time for Hypertext 2001. The specification document is 10 times the size of SMIL 1.0, offering many new, rich features and constructs. SMIL 2.0 also has the backing of major industrial players, such as Microsoft, RealNetworks and Macromedia.

Before describing the details of the SMIL language, the tutorial first presents an overview of the components required in a hypermedia document description language. The SMIL language includes features for specifying the media items included in a document, referred to with URL's, how these are temporally and spatially related to one another, and how links can be specified within the multimedia environment. Alternates for different data formats for the heterogeneous web environment are also provided.

The goal of the tutorial is to explain the concepts that form the basis of the SMIL language and to provide sufficient detail on the language itself so that participants can create their own simple presentations. Participants will also understand the underlying issues of temporal and spatial layout and the complexity of creating links within multimedia. The tutorial also describe the use of the major SMIL implementations: the RealPlayer, the GRiNS authoring environment, and HTML+SMIL on Internet Explorer.

The tutorial is intended for content developers who have created HTML documents or have used tools such as Macromedia Director or Authorware. Multimedia designers, web-page creators, creators of interface prototypes such as user interface designers, human factors practitioners and industrial designers will also benefit from this course. It can also be followed usefully by participants unfamiliar with existing tools and environments. The level is introductory and expects knowledge of the Web at a user's level, not necessarily that of an HTML author. Familiarity with basic HTML constructs is desirable, though not necessary.

T3: Metadata management through open hypermedia

Presenters
Peter J. Nürnberg and Uffe K. Wiil
Duration
Half day
Date
To be announced
Presenter Bio

Both Peter J. Nürnberg and Uffe K. Wiil are Associate Professors in the Department of Computer Science at Aalborg University Esbjerg in Denmark. Between the two are a collective 24 years of hypermedia and 12 years of digital libraries research, as well as over 10 conference committee positions at the last 3 ACM HT and ACM DL conferences. They have been engaged in the design and implementation of open hypermedia systems aimed specifically at metadata management in a digital libraries setting for several years, most recently within the Construct framework.

Description

Metadata is "data about data", or information that allows more efficient, higher quality querying, management, and organization of data. High-quality metadata management is especially important when data sources are large, distributed, and heterogeneous. This course reviews basic metadata management principles, and focuses on how open hypermedia technologies can be leveraged to address metadata management problems.

Course attendees will receive both theoretical background and "hands-on" experience using open hypermedia system components designed specifically for metadata management tasks within large, distributed, heterogeneous information environments. Attendees will learn how to use exisiting open hypermedia system components as well as how to design and implement custom-built components to apply to their metadata management tasks.

The course will consist of 4 modules, each 30-60 minutes in length.

Introduction and background
Introduction to metadata management tasks and open hypermedia. Review of the relevant concepts, terminology, and research.
Construct
Introduction to the Construct component-based open hypermedia system. Brief explanation of installation procedures, including demonstration installation. Description of system architecture, including how the system can be extended.
Case study
Introduction to an actual metadata management problem from the botanical taxonomy area. Problem description and analysis. Step-by-step demonstration of components designed and implemented specifically for this problem area.
Extensions
The design and implementation of extensions to the Construct system will be discussed, drawing on actual problems of the course attendees. Research an implementation coalition building between attendees themselves and also with the instructors, with the goal of providing a concrete plan for how to deploy and customize Construct at attendee sites.

The intended audience consists primarily people involved in large-scale data management tasks, whether as curators, collectors, web site administrators, data store managers, or programmers. Secondarily, the audience might contain members who have theoretical interests only in applications of metadata and open hypermedia research.

T4: Evaluating, Using, and Publishing eBooks

Presenters
Elli Mylonas, Cathy Marshall and Gene Golovchinsky
Duration
Full day
Date
To be announced
Presenter Bio

Gene Golovchinsky is a Senior Research Scientist at FX Palo Alto Laboratory (FXPAL), where he is a member of the Mobile computing group. His research interests include user interface design (with an emphasis on information exploration and information retrieval), hypertext, and pen-based computing. Gene completed his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto in 1996. Prior to joining FXPAL, Gene had worked at GMD-IPSI in Darmstadt, Germany, at IBM, and at Kaiser Electronics. See http://www.fxpal.xerox.com/people/gene

Cathy Marshall is an Architect and Senior Researcher in the eBooks Group at Microsoft, and a long-time participant in the international Hypertext, Digital Library, and WWW research communities. She is on the Board of Directors of the Electronic Literature Organization. Her research lies in the disciplinary interstices of computer science, social science, and the arts. See http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/~marshall.

Elli Mylonas is Associate Director for Projects and Research at the Scholarly Technology Group, Brown University. Her current work includes a project to convert structured document formats to OEB. She was one of the founding members of the Perseus Project at Harvard University, an early hypertext for scholarly and pedagogical use. She has worked extensively with SGML and XML and OEB, and has spoken and published on markup, hypertext and academic computing projects.

Description

This tutorial introduces the audience to a range of issues related to eBooks: hand-held devices dedicated to reading books and other documents. The last two years have seen an unprecedented increase in the number and variety of devices and software designed to support reading. Individuals, small-volume publishers, distributors and resellers, and large corporations have contributed to this growth in various ways. Consumer awareness of-and interest in-eBooks has also increased.

But what exactly are these devices? How does one read on them? Where do the titles come from? How can they be created and sold? What are the legal issues surrounding these devices? How do they compare to paper? How will their use affect traditional book businesses and practices, including publishers, book stores, and public and personal libraries, among others? This tutorial will provide answers to these questions, and will give participants hands-on experience with a range of currently-available devices.

The first part of this tutorial will cover features of eBooks, including form factor, hardware and software interfaces, and how they compare with "reading on the web." We will then demonstrate and critique existing devices. The second part of the tutorial will start with an introduction to the Open eBook Format Specification. We will also discuss and demonstrate the publishing process, give a brief overview of Digital Rights Management (DRM) issues, and conclude with a discussion of the future of eBook devices and online reading. We will devote a part of the day to a hands-on exploration and critique of some of the commonly-available eBook devices.

T5: Introduction to XML

T6: Introduction to XLink

Presenters
Steven DeRose and David Durand
Duration
1/2 day each
Date
To be announced
Presenter Bio

Steven J. DeRose is Chief Scientist at Inso Corporation, and Visiting Chief Scientist at the Brown Univesity Scholarly Technology Group. Dr. DeRose is an Editor of the Xlink specification, and has taken part in the XML, TEI, and HyTime standards efforts. He was a founder of Electronic Book Technologies and architect of the Dynatext product. He was head of the TEI working group on Hypertext representation, and wrote the TEI hypertext specification with David.

David Durand is VP software architecture at ingenta plc. Dr. Durand is a co-author, with Steve, of "Making Hypermedia Work: A User's Guide to HyTime." He has taken part in the Text Encoding Initiative, XML, HyTime, and and WebDAV standards efforts, and has been working with and on structured document representations and hypertext for the last 20 years, in academic and industrial contexts.

Description (T5)

XML is a core document technology, whose relations to hypertext are still being explored, and for which new applications are still being found. This course provides an introduction to XML. This course will comprise a technical overview about the language itself, as well as information about its applications (especially as they relate to hypertext). We will also discuss its goals and creation, and discuss its place in the group of related standards efforts, such as Xlink, RDF, XSL, and DOM. The course is targetted at anyone who thinks they need a technical and strategic overview of XML.

Description (T6)

XML is starting to revolutionize the way data and documents are managed and produced, on the web and elsewhere, by bringing years of text-encoding experience to bear on the problem. XLink promises to do the same thing for hypertext linking. Xlink provides much more powerful link representation and addressing features than HTML. This tutorial will explain XLink and will then examine some techniques for using it in combination with XSLT. The course is targetted towards anyone who knows something about XML and wants to see how it can be used to support advanced hypertext functionality. It assumes a basic knowledge of XML (see Tutorial 5!), and some knowledge of hypertext linking.

Last modified: Sunday, 22-Apr-2001 14:13:27 CEST